A First: Grammar Glitch spotted in The New Yorker!

December 23rd, 2015

polar bear with melting iceI read articles in The New Yorker whenever I have a little down time. They are always informative, interesting, and well written. The magazine's editorial staff is meticulous.

I'm often several months behind because the magazine comes every week, so last week I was reading an article in the August 24, 2015, issue about the efforts of Christiana Figueres to persuade us all to take climate change seriously.

On page 30, I was surprised to come across this sentence with a Subject/Verb Agreement Glitch:

     "The practical obstacles to realizing any of these scenarios has prompted some experts to observe that, for all intents and purposes, the two-degree limit has already been breached."

Whoops! The subject of the sentence is OBSTACLES (plural), so the verb should be HAVE PROMPTED not HAS PROMPTED (singular).

This is the first time I have ever spotted a Grammar Glitch in The New Yorker. I suspect it will be a long time before I see another one!

NOTE: The Subject/Verb Agreement Glitch is rampant in "lesser" publications–especially headlines in local newspapers. To see three examples, please check my Facebook post for December 23 on the Grammar Glitch Central page.

 


To continue to keep….Another example of “bopping it twice.”

December 7th, 2015

It is easy to bop a concept twice when you are writing something. We all do it. Common examples include using ALSO and AS WELL together, BOTH of the TWO people, ALL of the TOTAL income, and money earned ANNUALLY PER YEAR. These examples have appeared in previous Grammar Glitch posts. 

I came across a new one in an article for The Birmingham News last week. In discussing gas prices, Leada Gore wrote this:

So how low can we go? According to AAA, prices are expected to continue to keep falling into 2016.

bopping it onceWhoops! Only one of the red phrases is needed. Either prices are expected TO CONTINUE FALLING or prices are expected TO KEEP FALLING. Bopping the nail on the head once will do!

The trick of a good writer–even a reporter who is on deadline–is to read back through and spot these redundancies before hitting the SEND button on the copy.


One Jeopardy! contestant does not = THEY or THEM!

November 9th, 2015

Jeopardy!_Season_30_title_card  JEOPARDY! is about to start its 2015 Tournament of Champions, which I always enjoy watching. The email announcement the program sent out is not, however, a champion as far as good grammar goes. Consider these two sentences:

"When the dust clears, one contestant will be crowned the TOC Champion. Alex Trebek will present them with a check for $250,000, and they will hold on to bragging rights for the following year."

Whoops! Only one contestant wins the tournament. THEY and THEM refer to more than one person, and the prize money is not going to be split. However, what to do with the sticky problem of using HIS or HER or (shudder!) HIS/HER because we don't know if the winner will be male or female. Not an easy problem to solve, but here is my best suggestion:

When the dust clears, one contestant will be crowned the TOC Champion. Alex Trebek will present that champion with a check for $250,000, which comes with bragging rights for the following year.

For another example of an agreement problem, please check out today's Grammar Glitch Central entry on Facebook.


Hyphenation error has cows milking robots.

October 22nd, 2015

Regular reader Joe C. sent along this odd caption, which suggests the exact opposite of what it is supposed to convey. More and more small farms in Florida are now using ROBOTS to milk COWS. However, by inserting a hyphen between ROBOT and MILKING, the caption writer created an adjective (ROBOT-MILKING), which describes the cows. The caption should read something like this: ROBOTS NOW MILKING COWS.

Joe also posed a question I have often asked. "Do they even teach the proper use of hyphenated words in journalism classes?"
Robot milking cows


TO HIRE OR NOT TO HIRE: Do I really need an editor or a proofreader?

October 11th, 2015

The following article was shared with me by Angela Dunn who recently edited  Donna Roberts' debut novel Frayed. Angela makes some good points about the importance of writing well and the fact that every single one of us, no matter how good a writer, can benefit from having an extra pair (or two) of eyes check our work.

TO HIRE OR NOT TO HIRE: Do I really need an editor or proofreader?

     "He who represents himself has a fool for a client." This famous quote, attributed to Abraham Lincoln, can also apply to an author or journalist who doesn't feel the need to have someone edit his or her work. From novice authors to legends like Stephen King and Nicholas Sparks, it is not only beneficial but a necessity to have at least one good editor/proofreader. Although the author is the ultimate decision maker about writing style, there is always room for improvement. Just like all of us, authors may think they know about a particular topic only to realize they have been mistaken all along about a certain detail.

     Many of us have read a book or two where a particular place or thing was not described accurately. I don't mean the routine misspelling of a word or a misplaced colon, but rather a gaffe that bothers the reader even if it really has nothing to do with the story line.Newly published author Donna Roberts knew the importantce of editors and proofreaders and made sure to have several pairs of eyes read and advise on her writing. However, Donna ran into a few instances herself where she thought she knew about a particular subject and had no idea she had misrepresented something until it was pointed out by one of those pairs of eyes.

   okra podsFor example, at one point in the manuscript for Frayed, she had written about two of her characters cooking some very specific and unusual foods. Although Donna enjoys cooking and experiments with different foods, she wrote about cooking okra "stalks" and had no idea that okra is referred to as pods rather than stalks. Thankfully, she had a subject matter expert–someone who has worked for years in high end food service–take a look at the text. She then described the okra accurately. In another situation while writing the book, Donna described characters mixing some alcoholic drinks and referred to Jack Daniels as bourbon. One of her proofreaders pointed out that Jack Daniels is whiskey, and that pointer averted another misrepresentation.

    Donna also received editing help with several homophones (words that sound alike but have different meanings, like "flair" and "flare"). These were words that she, like all of us, had often used in conversation but was not sure how to spell out correctly.

    Simple mistakes like these that show up in a published book may or may not make a huge difference in sales; however, readers do expect accurate accounts, and authors lose credibility when a detail in the story is not factually accurate–even if that detail does not really affect the plot line of the book.

    The bottom line is that all of us make mistakes, even authors who know what they are writing about–or at least think they do. Having good editors and proofreaders check your work for general grammatical errors and for subject matter accuracy is of utmost importance and should never be overlooked, regardless of cost, inconvenience, or delay.

    FrayedIf you'd like to read Donna Roberts' book Frayed, you can find it on Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/Frayed-Ms-Donna-G-Roberts/dp/150305778X.

 


The more “literate” you are, the more you should care about literacy in the world!

September 9th, 2015

 

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Literacy-Day


Reporter locates apostrophe correctly, then forgets the rule before the end of the sentence.

July 28th, 2015

One short article about taxes and sewage contains two Glitches.

Here is the first Glitch, which is puzzling because the reporter uses the apostrophe correctly in the first part of the sentence but then uses it incorrectly later in the same sentence:

Evans also said he met with the USDA about the agency's grant and loan programs to help with the towns old sewage system.

It is correct to show that the PROGRAMS belong to the AGENCY (agency's programs). Okay, so why would it not be correct to refer to the SEWAGE SYSTEM as belonging to the TOWN (town's old sewage system)? The sentence should read this way:

Evans also said he met with the USDA about the agency's grant and loan programs to help with the town's old sewage system.

This same reporter does not know the difference between THERE (location) and THEIR (possessive). Here is the second Glitch:

The USDA told the town in there meeting that they needed an audit to go forward.

Whoops! The meeting belongs to the town, so it should be spelled THEIR.


What is the value of one “M”? Spelling error costs one county $4,000.

July 6th, 2015

Some say spelling does not matter in today's world of shortened messaging, but at least one county government thinks spelling is important enough to pay $4,000 plus ten days' labor costs to add adhesive labels with a needed "M" to ten signs with the word COMMISSIONER spelled incorrectly, My thanks to regular reader Joe C. for sharing this article.

spelling COMMISSIONERS


Subject/Verb Agreement Glitches Shared by a Regular Reader

April 28th, 2015

It is not just The Birimingham News that is creating Glitches with its headlines. Regular reader Joe C. sent three examples from Florida recently. Here is the first one: 

Joe C headline April 2015  Whoops! DRONE KILLINGS is plural, so the verb used with it should be UP (with no S), not UPS (which is singular). DRONE KILLINGS UP PRESSURE FOR NEW HOSTAGE STRATEGY.

 

 

 

 

 

 

THREATS MAKES headline Joe C April 2015  Whoops again! THREATS is plural, so the verb with it should be MAKES (without the S). RISING THREATS MAKE KURDISH OIL LESS ATTRACTIVE.

 

 

 

 

 

Pic for Grammar Glitch from Joe C Whoops once more!

 

Apparently, those who create those pesky crawls at the bottom of the screen are not immune to this Grammar Glitch either. STRIKES (plural) is the subject here, so the verb should be KILL, not KILLS, which is singular. U.S. DRONE STRIKES ACCIDENTALLY KILL AMERICAN, ITALIAN AL-QAEDA HOSTAGES.

PLEASE NOTE: Aside from the grammar points relating to these news items, this is a sad subject, and we offer condolences to the families involved.

 

 

Apparently the subject/verb agreement Glitch is reaching epidemic proportions. Here is an advertisement headline with the reverse problem. It appeared on my screen the other day as I tried to play Words with Friends:

NEW RULE LEAVE DRIVERS SURPRISED

In this one, the subject is RULE, which is singular. Therefore, the verb should be LEAVES, not LEAVE, which is plural. It should read: NEW RULE LEAVES DRIVERS SURPRISED. NOTE: I didn't bother to click and find out what the new rule is.

 


Newspapers Still Need Copy Editors!

April 22nd, 2015

Newspaper reporters and columnists can no longer rely on copy editors to polish their usage and grammar. More than one of them has actually thanked Grammar Glitch Central for pointing out an error or two. There should be someone at the newspaper office whose job it is to know good writing standards and apply them while proofreading. These days that is not happening. Reporters write their own copy, do their own proofreading, and click SEND.

Recently, a new problem is cropping up. Even if the reporters get it right, whoever creates the photo captions, headlines, and sidebars is making careless errors that detract from the quality of the reporting. That person ought to have a good command of standard writing skills and a desire to proofread for correctness. In ONE issue of The Birmingham News this past week, the following errors appeared in headlines, captions, and sidebars:

Whoops #1: In an article about the gyrocopter that landed in DC, the Tribune News Service reporter correctly stated that the pilot must stay away from the CAPITOL (the building), but the photographic caption says that "Doug Hughes landed on the grass in front of the United States CAPITAL on Wednesday." CAPITAL refers to the entire city. CAPITOL is the building in front of which Hughes landed.

Whoops #2: Columnist Edward Bowser correctly named the Birmingham Children's THEATRE when he referred to it numerous times in his article about their wonderful program of taking performances to schools. However, the headline for his column is this: "Birmingham Children's THEATER brings magic of stage to schools." Perhaps the incorrect spelling of a proper name is not a big deal, but I'm sure that group consciously chose to use the THEATRE spelling, and it would not have taken the headline creator more than a minute to check the website for the proper spelling–especially since Bowser had handed that person the correct spelling.

Whoops #3: In Mike Oliver's creepy but informative article about Alabama's 58 spider varieties, Mike correctly spelled RECLUSE when he listed the brown recluse as one of the three highly venomous spiders in the state. However, the caption next to the photo of this spider refers to it as the Brown RECLUDE Spider.

Whoops #4: In a sidebar that summarizes the details of an article about Alabama's pro-life legislature and the abortion issue, the first bullet contains this grammatically incorrect sentence: "Women must receive counseling designed to discourage her from having an abortion." WOMEN is plural. Therefore, the correct pronoun would be THEY. The sentence should be worded one of two ways: 1) WOMEN must receive counseling to discourage THEM from having ABORTIONS. or 2) A WOMAN must receive counseling to discourage HER from having an abortion.

Whoops #5: Those who create photo captions should understand where commas should go and, more importantly, where they should not go. One comma "rule" is that, if a title comes before a person's name, it is not necessary to set that name off (like an appositive) with commas. A second "rule" is that a subject should not be separated from a verb by a comma. In this sentence from a caption about a tour of a school campus, the comma between WILLIAMS and LEADS is incorrect: "Here, former Hoover schools Superintendent Connie Williams, leads faculty and parents from Shades Mountain Christian Schoool on a tour…."

It should not be unreasonable to expect a better level of correct usage than this. These are not acceptable errors.